Thursday, August 21, 2014

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo by Ted W. Lawson



Why I Read It: I'm still pursuing every story ever told about World War II.

Summary: A first-person narrative of the Doolittle raid in April 1942 by a B-25 pilot who survived it.

My Thoughts: I grabbed this book from a box of old tomes I had stashed away. When I pulled it out, it just felt right in my hands. My copy is an original 1943 edition, with nothing but a little top-down silhouette of a B-25 on the cover. It just drew me in, and I knew it's time had come.

When I purchased it, years ago, I did so because of the familiarity of the title, tying it into the movie of the same name. I've been a World War II-era movie buff for as long as I've been fascinated with reading books about the conflict. I had no idea, though, that the tale would be so gripping.

There are no chapters, no natural breaks in the story, and because of that fact, the book moves. And, due to the nature of the tale - training, transit, mission, crash, escape, repatriation, recovery - breaks are unnecessary. I found it hard to stop reading anywhere, not because there were no convenient places to bookmark, but because there was no stopping the flow. Once the crash occurs, every page brings another bit of tension. How close are the Japanese troops? Will they catch them, or will the Americans get away? What will become of the people who help them if the Japanese find them?

The book is full of raw World War II-style hatred for the enemy, and is a great immersion in the thought cycles of the day. In some ways, it's spooky to see the old style printing of names like "Dr. C_____," knowing that the author was protecting the identity of someone who was still at deep risk of capture and death at the hands of the Japanese. Lawson practices the same routine with the names of the villages he wound through during the tumultuous escape attempt, not wanting to give the Japanese a trail to follow.

In retrospect, it's amazing what was pulled off by the bombers on the Doolittle raid, a slug back into the face of the enemy in response to Pearl Harbor. The logistics of the raid called for guts in the extreme. Launching B-25's off an aircraft carrier had never been done, and for this raid the plan was to land in Chinese airfields, refuel and keep going. But being spooked by the presence of Japanese ships at sea, the planes flew earlier than expected off the Hornet and mostly ran out of or very low on fuel searching for the airfields in a storm. It was a miracle that the men who made it home did so.

Lawson lost a lot, personally, as a result of the mission, but did it for the right reasons for the time. He waved the American flag with his words at a time when many Americans needed such encouragement. That old school patriotism is generally lost now, but it was a building block to the world of today.

But no matter what one's opinions on those topics may be, as a piece of literature, this book is as thrilling as anything I've ever read. It's now permanently out of the box and onto my shelf.

Friday, August 15, 2014

Stones and Bones of New England by Lisa Rogak


Why I Read It: I am a self-professed taphophile.

Summary: A reference guide to some of the most historic and interesting cemeteries in the six New England states.

My Thoughts: It'd be easy for me to go on a rant about opportunities missed, but I think there's an important note that needs to be made about this book. The subtitle calls it  "a guide to unusual historic and otherwise notable cemeteries," not "the guide."

For you see, this is New England! We have such great depth of history (note - yes, Medievalists and researchers of antiquity, American history is but current events, but work with me here) that cemeteries in every town hold tales. Even the remotest of communities, in the deepest, darkest corners of New England, have secrets that rival all others around them.

So I won't even mention my list of cemeteries that could have been mentioned in this book. Instead, I'll simply applaud it for what it is: a wonderful survey. Sometimes, the place is the story. In other places, it may be an individual stone. In still others, it's a stonecarver who left his unique stamp on the local history. The author takes us on a quick journey through a few dozen of New England's most hallowed and most fascinating burial grounds.

As a collector - not of anything in particular, just one who tends to gather things - I've found cemeteries among my most beloved treasures. Use this book to get you started, then remember that no matter where you are, a cemetery will have a story for you.

Monday, August 11, 2014

The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs



Why I Read It: I'd read the other three A.J. Jacobs titles.

Summary: Jacobs continues his pursuit of self-improvement, this time focusing on his soul.

My Thoughts: When I first read the subtitle ("One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible"), I thought to myself, "How funny is that?! Why would anybody ever want to do such a thing?"

And the cover of the book, I think, fueled those thoughts. The robe, the sandals, the big beard, all juxtaposed with the New York City skyline, are meant to draw you in. Imagine, somebody walking around a modern-day American city dressed like a Jew from more than 2000 years ago! What will they think of next...

And it is funny. Jacobs is a talented writer. But I liken this work to Tony Horwitz' Confederates in the Attic. In that book, the author toured the South to find the places where the Civil War was still being fought, and found it in myriad places. In this book, Jacobs sought those places where the Bible is being taken at its literal word, the places where the ancient beliefs of the Middle Eastern lands still resonate today.

Much like Horwitz, Jacobs finds that hatred is rampant. Horwitz found racism, Jacobs finds antisemitism, misogyny and homophobia, all of which are derived from - and justified by - interpretations of the Bible. Of course, he finds plenty of good in the religious world, always seeking both sides to every debate. And while the book focuses on the beard, the clothing, and blowing a horn on the first day of the new month, the true story lies in the spiritual transformation Jacobs undergoes. He searches his soul during his Biblical year for signs of increased passion for religion, for deeper belief.

As usual with Jacobs, his family life plays heavily in the story, and why not? If you've got it, flaunt it. His collection of aunts, uncles and cousins provides entertainment enough in the many side stories he presents as his beard gets bigger and his list of OCD-like rituals grows. Life lessons play out before his eyes, and he finds their parallels in Biblical passages, reminding him that while a situation might seem new - a death in the family, etc. - it never is; somebody, somewhere has fought their way through it before.

If you've got heavy religious sensitivities in any way, this book is not for you. If you're agnostic and have ever wondered how the other half lives, or if you've got an open mind as far as religion goes, and are willing to let one voice tell you the story of one man's immersion in that world, then pick it up.